Hammersmith Reflections

A blog written by our Trustees - Julian Hillman

February can be a sad month, fortitude tested by continuing winter, with summer still a long way off.  Sad for me personally, because I have to stand down as a trustee of Hammersmith Unite Charities (HUC) after 12+ years and also because Oxfam who I have supported for over 50 years is in trouble.

Integrity for charities is vital, as is well considered risk taking and I feel confident in saying that HUC passes both tests.  Some of the grants we make do not succeed, but if we took no risks we would greatly decrease our helping power and initiatives that are now massive successes would never have seen the light of day.

Mark Goldring, the Oxfam GB boss, used to work for National Mencap and I got to know him a bit.  He is a man of great energy and intellect.  He is apologising for what happened in Haiti and elsewhere as he should, but he is also asking whether some of the criticism is motivated by dislike of what Oxfam does. Balanced in the scales, I am sure the good done outweighs the wickedness ten thousand fold.

The charitable impulse is heart warming and strong in Muslim, Christian, other religious traditions and secular movements.  It can be naive and destructive to give, but not to give shrinks the soul and destroys our humanity.  The reinvention of the grant making arm of HUC during my trusteeship is something I am immensely proud of and in which I played a small part.  In the past there have been those in HUC not confident that grant making is correct – “God helps those who help themselves” or “Leg up not hand out”, both reasonable sentiments in context, but allowing for the possibility of not helping those in trouble when we should.

From Hollywood through Rome, Canterbury and on to Haiti, great institutions are mired in stories of sexual exploitation and the obdurate denial thereof.  However, if we closed every institution, in which some members had exploited women and children, what would we have left?  While apologising again and again, Goldring is right to look at critics’ motivation.

From my work with Mencap I know that it is those least able to speak up who are most at risk of abuse.  If Hollywood super stars find it hard, then think about a woman with Down’s syndrome living in a care home being able to support “#Me Too”.

Integrity is hard to prove and one can be misled by silence, smooth talking and power, “Plate sin with gold, And the strong lance of justice breaks” says the not so mad King Lear.  So out of my February sadness, comes a cry for more charity, more vigilance, a positive future for Oxfam, which I will continue to support financially and the hope my successors at HUC will find even better ways of making grants and taking sensible risks to help people in Hammersmith.

Julian Hillman
18th February 2018

Hammersmith Reflections – Our retiring Chairman, Mike Smith, reflects on 12 years as a trustee

It’s become a tradition at Hammersmith United Charities that retiring trustees are invited to share their reflections on their time at the charity at their final board meeting. (more…)

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Hammersmith Reflection – Artists in Residence

Encouraging creativity and participation in the arts is an important part of our work at Hammersmith United Charities. Cultural events help to improve wellbeing,  remove barriers to social inclusion and contribute to safer and stronger communities.

In June 2019,  we held “Artists in Residence”, an exhibition of work by local artists, including residents of our sheltered housing at John Betts House and Sycamore House. The exhibition was part of HF ArtsFest, an annual platform to celebrate the exceptional artists living in the borough, and we were proud to showcase the breadth of talent within the residents of our Almshouses and enable members of our local community to display their work.

The exhibition was kindly opened by Andy Slaughter MP at a fun evening at Pekoe Mellow Tea House jam packed with our friends and neighbours.

We are very grateful to the artists who allowed us to exhibit their work: Bill Forbes Hamilton, Bryan Payne and Pat Carey-Willis from John Betts House; Betty Dwyer and Joan Hurrell from Sycamore House; Carey Whitley, Dickon Reed and Jamik Wilkins from the Grove Neighbourhood Folk Art Group and local artist Layne Wyatt  Thank you also to Zena Zialor for photographing the opening night, our colleague Nora Laraki for curating the artworks and everyone who attended the exhibition.

Many of the artists have enjoyed attending the Grove Neighbourhood Fold Art Group run by Rachel Leach, a project supported by Hammersmith United Charities. Everybody is welcome regardless of their experience so if you think you could be Hammersmith’s next Picasso please take a look!    

For more photos, click here.

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Hammersmith Reflections – photojournalist Cinzia D’Ambrosi and her work for the local community

I am an independent award winning photojournalist, local resident, founder of the Photojournalism Hub. My passion and drive is to expose social justice issues through photo stories for these to be of leverage and/or of a conduit for action and change. Some of the projects I have been working on, have been exposing the plight of miners in illegal coal mines in China, the hidden homelessness in the UK with a particular focus on women and their children, police violence against refugees and asylum seekers in Europe. Through my career, I developed many collaborations with NGO’s and charities, including international campaigns with Amnesty International and Protection Approaches, Shelter in the UK. These have shaped the Photojournalism Hub’ aims. The value of connecting photojournalism to effective change and to promote photojournalism work is very important to me. Photojournalism exposes issues, raises awareness and importantly can bring about changes and recommendations in legislations, public opinion and indeed calls for action. The Photojournalism Hub is born out of these aspirations: it presents photo stories needed to be told and it has a programme that focuses on working together with communities and charities to find solutions, advocacy and exposure. Since its launch last November, the Photojournalism Hub has received an amazing support, interest and engagement from the wide public and local communities in our Talk Events, Photojournalism Nights, Open Forums and Workshops and from local organisations such as Imperial College, Hammersmith United Charities, White City Place, Petit Miracles, Stanhope, Elephant West, HFArts Fest, Re:Centre, Lido Foundation and London Borough of Hammersmith and Fulham.

THE OPEN FORUMS – WORKING TOGETHER FOR SOLUTION MAKING

The Open Forums are open conversations with different communities. The idea is born from wanting to change the way we engage on social justice issues. Often, we assume that ‘we’ know what is happening to a community, instead of getting to know what is really happening. Conversations are just the first steps; a valuable way to share knowledge and in future deliver what is really needed. From the Open Forums, Photojournalism Hub creates a shareable resource content and further develops a photography based programme that addresses the issues being raised. Sometimes ideas, however beautiful, can just remain as such unless tried and tested. That the Open Forums are being well received is very important to me and I am grateful to Hammersmith United Charities for supporting them and trusting in their value in our communities.

PHOTOJOURNALISM NIGHTS, TALK EVENTS AND EXHIBITIONS

I am sharing below some keystone moments in photographs. The opening was marked by a meaningful talk by Andy Slaughter on the power of photojournalism. Since the launch, the Photojournalism Hub has presented talks on picturing community engagement with participatory photography and collaborative practices, on photojournalism today, and on domestic violence and masculinities. We have organised and presented the first Photojournalism Nights at the Elephant west gallery and we have been invited to be a partner of this year’s HF-Arts festival in which we presented a curated photography exhibition Marginal at Re:centre gallery. We deliver photography workshops at low costs and we are about to begin free photography workshops for Somali young people in collaboration with Lido Foundation and Petit Miracles.

Rob Pinney presenting his project ‘Calais, ma ville’
Ingrid Guyon discussing participatory photography at Picturing Community Engagement talk @ White City Place
Discussing photojournalism aims at Imperial College Talk event
A moment during a Photography Workshop @ Petit Miracles

It has been a milestone to present some of today’s courageous, committed photojournalism work in White City. Photojournalism deserves ample space as a form that engages, exposes and initiates actions for change. If you wish to get to know more about the Photojournalism Hub work, I would like to encourage you to sign up to our newsletter on www.photojournalismhub.org or follow us on social media: @PJ_Hub; #photojournalism_hub; Fb: Photojournalismhub

June 2019
Cinzia D’Ambrosi

 

 

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Grants Awarded May 2019

We are delighted to announce our new grantees for May 2019. We give grants to local organisations supporting local people and this year we have increased the total value of grants available to £400,000 to mark 400 years of supporting the people of Hammersmith. The next deadline for grant applications is 2 October 2019. If you’ve got a great idea then we’d love to hear from you at grants@hamunitedcharities.com

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