A board of voluntary trustees some nominated by local organisations linked to the 17th century donors (the current Bishop of Fulham and the Latymer Foundation) governs the charity and shapes its strategy. We are always on the look out for new trustees – local people with skills and experience to contribute.

Vivienne Lukey

Chair of Trustees

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Vivienne Lukey

Chair of Trustees

Chair of Trustees

“I have lived in Hammersmith for 35 years. Now retired from full time work, I was previously a Director of Specialist Social Services in a central London borough. I have Chaired Hammersmith and Fulham Mind and Yarrow Housing. I was the Councillor for Fulham Reach ward and I was the Cabinet Member for Health and Adult Social Care. I joined the board to ensure a good relationship between the charity and the council and to promote the role of the charity in our area” – Trustee since 2014

Sian Davis

Trustee and appointee of the Latymer Foundation

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Sian Davis

Trustee and appointee of the Latymer Foundation

Chair of Housing and Property Committee

“The charity is important to me because it listens to those who may not have a strong voice  – and it helps in the most practical way, by putting a roof over peoples’ heads.  The grants for local projects is also hugely important for young people. There are a lot of creative ideas from local organisations that are able to be put into practise due to the grants. Hammersmith is special because of its diversity. It’s a vibrant and area that represents all that I love about London.” – Trustee since 2017

Sam Deards

Trustee

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Sam Deards

Trustee

Chair of Grants and Partnerships  Committee

“I grew up and went to school in Hammersmith and I have always loved the rich history and diversity of the area. The Charity is important to me because of the opportunity to help the less well off who live in the area and connect people from all backgrounds to increase greater community cohesion and neighbourliness” – Trustee since 2014

David Bailey

Deputy Chair

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David Bailey

Deputy Chair

Deputy Chair of Trustees and Chair of Finance and Investment Committee

“I was a founder of a large specialist accounting company based in London and around the world. Hammersmith is where I live. Its where I have friends and where I socialise. Its a very big part of my life. I am very aware that some people have it harder than others and we need to make Hammersmith a fairer and better place for all. HUC is all about Hammersmith and the people that live in it.” – Trustee since 2017

Bernadette McGlew

Trustee

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Bernadette McGlew

Trustee

“I have many years practical experience within the charitable sector, working with a range of organisations tackling social disadvantage and exclusion. I was born and brought up in Shepherd’s Bush. I was drawn to HUC as a local charity, embedded and connected to the community it seeks to serve and I very much look forward to being an active part of the HUC community.” – Trustee since 2017

Ben Humphries

Trustee and appointee of the Bishop of Kensington

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Ben Humphries

Trustee and appointee of the Bishop of Kensington

“I’m an ordained minister in the Church of England, working for the Anglican church in White City and Wormholt. I am part of the community on the estate and I meet the residents daily, they tell me their experiences and I try to understand the issues that affect their lives. What I love about Hammersmith the most is the youthfulness, the creative energy and the sense of enjoyment that people get out of life. With help of Hammersmith United Charities, we have the resources to make life better here.” – Trustee since October 2017

Adam Matan

Trustee

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Adam Matan

Trustee

Trustee since 2018

Cllr Christabel Cooper

Trustee and appointee of LBHF

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Cllr Christabel Cooper

Trustee and appointee of LBHF

Trustee since 2018

Mark Higton

Trustee

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Mark Higton

Trustee

Trustee since 2018

Maneksh Dattani

Trustee

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Maneksh Dattani

Trustee

“I have lived in the Hammersmith borough for the last 20 years and have been involved in community projects as I believe this is the best way to give back and enrich the area you live in.” – Trustee since September 2019

Richard Jablonowski

Trustee

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Richard Jablonowski

Trustee

“I first arrived in Hammersmith and Fulham nearly 25 years ago, and despite having moved away, have been back since 2011 and feel that it is a community in which I will remain. One of the key benefits to living in the borough is the diverse range of backgrounds that give it a vibrancy that makes it an inclusive area in which to live and work. I strongly believe that there is much more that can be done by local residents to help others that are less fortunate. I have had 25 years’ experience in the financial services industry, initially qualifying as a chartered accountant, and then applying those skills to my career within the wealth management industry. I am ready to apply my skills, expertise and passion towards HUC and helping to steer it towards even greater success for another 400 years.” – Trustee since September 2019

Amir Sadjady

Trustee

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Amir Sadjady

Trustee

“I have vast local business experience and last year I was a local council candidate for White City & Wormholt. I am passionate about Hammersmith and would like to contribute to making it a better place for all its residents.” – Trustee since September 2019

Louise Delahunty

Trustee

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Louise Delahunty

Trustee

Louise Delahunty is a solicitor who has had a 30 year career in litigation and white collar crime investigations. Louise has advised individuals and corporations in the UK, and internationally, on business crime and compliance issues. Louise has also chaired and served on numerous committees including the Law Society of England and Wales and the Confederation of European Bars, dealing with issues of criminal and tax law, and has represented the legal profession in lobbying the EU and UK Government.
Louise is a local resident, living in Chiswick, and has joined HUC as a Trustee in March 2020.

Helen Black, MBE

Trustee

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Helen Black, MBE

Trustee

“I’ve lived near Hammersmith for over 30 years, my son was at school here, a number of my clients are on Shepherds Bush Green. I like Ravenscourt Park and love the Bridge. Did I mention the pubs? It’s bustling and multi-cultured, and I hope that my previous charity and Trustee experiences, and my background in TV, can contribute positively to its future.”

Trustee since March 2020

Cllr Fiona Smith

Trustee and appointee of LBHF

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Cllr Fiona Smith

Trustee and appointee of LBHF

“I have lived in Hammersmith for five years, and in that time worked in the third sector in event management, community engagement and fundraising for different organisations. Prior to moving to Hammersmith, I served with Essex Police and Royal Air Force, and briefly lived in Japan.”

Trustee since March 2020

Opening our doors to older people in need of a home

We’re inviting older people on a low income and looking for an affordable new home to tour our Almshouses.

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“There is a real beauty in humans connecting through music”

Passionate about the “endless possibilities” of disabled and non-disabled artists dancing together, one of our grantees Turtle Key Arts is bringing our community back together again with its integrated dance events this summer.

With life slowly getting back to some sort of normality, many community organisations are relishing the thought of more in-person time with their beneficiaries at last. As Kelly Bray, Turtle Key Arts producer, puts it: “I am so thrilled to get back out there. Most of our projects this year are about getting people back together – they are so desperate to perform again.”

For Turtle Key Arts, creative producers based in Hammersmith and Fulham, that means helping disabled and non-disabled people find expression and connect through dance and music. Dancing can increase physical fitness but can also have other benefits for people with disabilities, like improving motor skills, building friendships and boosting self-esteem. But with 11 million people with a disability in the UK, many find themselves locked out of the world of performing arts. “People with disabilities are often put ‘in a box’ and given little chance of mixing with people creatively,” says Kelly.

Making dance accessible to all is at the heart of Turtle Key Arts’ work; it celebrates the power of ‘integrated dancing’ with both disabled and non-disabled artists. Kelly believes that this kind of dancing creates all kinds of creative and social opportunities. “Our approach is to bring down the barriers. We highlight abilities, rather than disabilities. There is a real beauty in humans connecting and exploring in different ways to music. They might be working with a wheelchair, or crutches – it makes you realise how much people can do. It feels like the possibilities are endless,” she says.

This year the team is bringing back two in-person summer projects, the Joy Festival and the Young Amici Summer School, which are funded by Hammersmith United Charities.

Joy Festival
The Joy Festival is a disability arts festival and is on track to run in real life this year. It’s a celebration of disabled and non-disabled artists through a programme of visual art, music, theatre and dance. The festival includes a week-long programme of integrated performances at Hammersmith’s Lyric Theatre in September. There will also be 3 big family fun day in August, with dance, circus and art sessions, along with creative workshops in the community.

Joy was founded in 2018, says, Kelly, “because there is just not enough celebration of disabled artists in the borough, and not enough networks for them to connect with others. We really needed to create a community where we can share stuff.”

Young Amici summer school

Another project is the Young Amici Summer School by Amici Dance Theatre Company which Turtle Key Arts produce, is for disabled and non-disabled people between age 11-25. This free summer school in August is for any young people interested in dance and developing their skills in a fun and safe space. The programme aims to deepen young people’s experience of participation in dance and spark curiosity and creativity.

Throughout the week, young people can pick and choose which classes they join and then take part in improvised dancing with props. The idea, says Kelly, is for dancers to use their ability as their strength. Then the dancers share their piece at the end of the week. Pastoral care is part of the creative process, so there are chill out spaces and experts who can support where needed.

The positive impact on young disabled people in this creative environment is striking, says Kelly: “I remember a young person who had learning disabilities – they were so nervous and thought everyone was judging them. Now they are doing solos and making friends so easily. It’s lovely to watch – they just enter the room so confidently and start dancing. One of our dancers says that taking part is the most free she’s ever felt.”

More information

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7 ways to improve your visual storytelling 

Want to make a film about the amazing work your community organisation does? Keep some of these visual storytelling ideas in mind to make your message unforgettable. 

By Carolyn Defrin, artist and Hammersmith United Charities collaborator. 

 

  1. Be specific
    Charities often have a similar remit to each other, working within the broad themes of ‘care’, ‘community’ and ’support’. To stand out from other organisations, consider a particular aspect of your work to bring the broader theme to life in an original way. 

    ‘The power of bicycles’ is a specific, meaningful story which shows how the project impacts many lives more broadly: watch here
     

  2. Be personal

    A great way to get specific is by telling personal stories from your staff, the people you serve, or both. This can be through an interview or someone telling a story. These stories open your audience up to emotional connection, allowing you to humanise your work.

    ‘An introduction to StoryCorps’ is a conversation between the founder and his young nephew that shows how you can be personal, emotional and humorous while clearly telling the story of your organisation: watch here
     

  3. Experiment with content

    How we tell stories visually doesn’t always have to be literal, especially when subject matter might be difficult (in the context of charitable work). Seeing a bird’s eye view of cakes being made or a close-up of a child’s green-painted hand – these images and perspectives invite us in emotionally, personally and memorably and enable us to engage with complex content in a new way.

    West London Death Cafe’s short film focuses on making cakes. This choice offers an unexpected and welcoming view of a charity focused on bringing people together to discuss a delicate subject: watch here 
     

  4. Consider all the senses 

    When we talk about film, we usually think of just sight and sound. But what about texture – how can you suggest how something feels to the touch? How can you suggest taste and smell, too? 

    ‘At home with: Carolyn Defrin’ is a short film demonstrating how close-ups of food can create a multi-sensory experience. Through opportunities to look at the texture of cabbage, hear the boiling of water and see the bright purple, orange and green vegetables together, we can be immersed in a new view of the story of migration being told: watch here
     

  5. Play with different points of view 

    Different camera angles and points of view will help you convey different emotions. For example, what might bird’s eye view or worm’s eye view help communicate? How might you share a perspective from a chair, or a building, or a specific person? 

    ‘Suspending Home’ is a film made by artist Khaled Barakeh that reflects on a project he made called On the Ropes where he suspended his studio as a way to reflect the groundlessness he felt as a migrant artist. He films from many different points of view to help capture this feeling: watch here
     

  6. Still photos can be just as effective

    You don’t always need live action footage – still photographs can offer a powerful tool in your film. When combined dynamically with thoughtful voice over, text, and/or music they can have just as much impact. 

    ‘Universality’ is a simple and effective use of pictures and voiceover: watch here
     

  7. Consider who is telling the story

    Consider who is telling the story of what you do. Can you engage those you serve to tell their own stories or offer their own points of view? Is there value in staff sharing their personal perspective on the work? Always stay mindful to the ways you ask those you serve to share their stories. 

    ‘Real Heroes’ is a great example by Rainbow Collective of children sharing their view of heroes during the pandemic. Through their voices, drawings, and music, we get to know their perspectives through a fully
    dimensional and creative lens: 
    watch here 

 


Find out more

Artist Carolyn Defrin worked with Hammersmith United Charities on our film project community@hammersmith, which provided a free workshop for local community organisations to learn about visual storytelling and filmmaking. Read about community@hammersmith. 

 

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