Hammersmith United Charities exists because of the generosity of Hammersmith’s more wealthy residents since 1618


In 1618, Dr Thomas Edwards gave £100 – which, according to the Bank of England, is worth about £10,000 in today’s money – to the poor of Fulham to buy them lands. Two years later, in 1620, Bishop John King, the then Bishop of London (after whom the main street in Hammersmith is named) donated £20 for a similar purpose. These two sums were added together and Dr. Edwards and Bishop King’s Fulham Charity was established. Much later, in 1834, the hamlet of Hammersmith became a separate parish to Fulham and, in 1863, the Charity Commissioners ordered that the income and assets from the combined Charities of Dr Edwards and Bishop King should be divided equally between a Fulham and Hammersmith branch; the latter being the “root” of Hammersmith United Charities.


Bishop John King

Other benefactors in the 17th Century, each of whom established his or her own individual Charity, included Edward Latymer (1624), William Payne (1626), Thomas Iles (1635), Thomas Collop (1645), Nathaniel Dauncer (1656) and Sir Nicholas Crispe (1665). In the 1700’s, Charities were established by Sarah Goudge (1759), John Powell (1773) and Henry Webb (1793) and, in the 1800’s, by the Waste Land Almshouses (1810), John Brown (1822), Peter Brown (1833), Mrs Harriet Clancy (1844), Dr John Betts (1859) and William Smith (1865). In the early 1900’s, bequests were made by Ellen Graves (1932) and Maria Eliza Morris (1948).

Sir Nicholas Crispe

Whilst the terms of each of our benefactors’ wills were different, the general thrust of each was either for the relief of poverty or the care and well-being of the elderly poor of Hammersmith and, in June 1923, the Charity Commissioners decreed that all the then individual Charities should amalgamate, under the title of Hammersmith United Charities. Subsequent governing trust instruments were issued in 1932, 1958, 1970, 1981 & 1982. In 1992, the Trustees applied to the Charity Commissioners for the addition to our objectives of the provision of an “Extra Care” branch and this request was incorporated in the Trust Deed of 14th July, 1992, the Charities’ current Governing Instrument.


Hammersmith Reflections

A blog written by our Trustees - Julian Hillman

February can be a sad month, fortitude tested by continuing winter, with summer still a long way off.  Sad for me personally, because I have to stand down as a trustee of Hammersmith Unite Charities (HUC) after 12+ years and also because Oxfam (more…)

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Aunt Esther’s Story – Enigma Event

Last Saturday we had our second Enigma Event in partnership with “Women Make Change” who put together a great event for International Women’s Day. Women Make Change is a charity that promotes and protects the health and safety of women and girls affected by domestic violence.

Melanie Nock took the chance to introduce Aunt Esther’s Story. Esther Bruce’s autobiography written by Stephen Bourne tells the story of a black London Seamstress from 1912–1994 and provides a first-hand account of the life of a black Londoner in the pre-Empire Windrush years. When Esther Bruce was born in Fulham in 1912 only small black communities exited in Britain.

Another big announcement was the launch of the “Agents for Change” Women’s Leadership Programme that we founded in partnership with the H&F Council, the Imperial College and the Lyric Hammersmith.

Applycations are open now, find more information here: http://www.agentsforchange.wixsite.com/agentsforchange 





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Call out for disabled Artists!

JOY is a new strand to the Hammersmith and Fulham Arts Fest celebrating local disabled (more…)

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Women Make Change – International Womens Day Event

Where: White City Community Centre
When: Saturday, 10.03.2018 starting at 3.30 (more…)

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